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The last section touches upon topics of death and afterlife through the presentation of the necropoleis, graves and grave offerings. The burial customs vary according to the time period, the identity of the deceased and his/her social and financial situation.

During the Geometric period, the cinerary urns reveal that cremation was a dominant practice for eminent adults, while the common practice for children was burial in clay vessels. Grave offerings, such as gold diadems and other jewelry, adorned the deceased before burial, while weapons were usually placed in the grave to highlight the heroic status of the dead.

Superbly painted lekythoi, bronze mirrors and jewels represent the customary offerings deposited in the graves of the Archaic and Classical period.

Finally, the rich finds from the Macedonian-type “Tomb of the Erotes” reflect the ostentation which was so prominent during the Hellenistic era, while the glass and clay vessels exhibited are typical grave goods of Roman times.

 
         
   
     
                    
HELLENIC MINISTRY OF CULTURE   
 
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